Peace be with you: what does it mean to have peace?

I attended daily mass Tuesday as part of Spirit and Truth. Father Daniel opened with an interesting question, “What are we worried about?” Some of the answers were failure, death, hurting others, and the state of society. Then Father Daniel asked, “what is the  peace Jesus promises to the disciples when he says, ‘Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give it to you. Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid.’?” I replied that, “it is a peace that passes understanding, a peace that transcends our surroundings, because we trust that Jesus will provide.” I was able to answer the question, because I’ve been lucky enough to experience this supernatural peace. Father Daniel challenged us to strive to carry this supernatural peace daily, My struggle is that even though I have experienced this peace, it has never lasted. I believe the peace stealer is either disappointment in oneself or disappointment in others.
Disappointment in oneself can be remedied by recognizing that we cannot disappoint God. He knows us intimately. He knows the number of hairs on our head. He is omniscient so he knows what we are going to do before we do it. Yet despite all of that, He still chose to die for us. God’s love is unconditional. This is the reality of Go’d’s love. By virtue of Baptism, we have been justified and sanctified. We are cleansed and have become new creations. We do nothing to earn this. Likewise, we cannot maintain it on our own; we need to rely on God, who doesn’t fail. So the next time we feel that we are a disappointment, or a failure, we can know that we haven’t lost the love of God and that we can trust  him to pick us back up. This truth leads to peace.
Disappointment in others can be a tricker situation. It comes from our need to feel accepted by others and our innate sense of righteousness. When we are rejected for whatever reason, we feel wronged. However, the reality is that we shouldn’t let others dictate our sense of worth nor should we feel the need to punish others for being equally broken people. The latter is what I struggle with; I want people to hold themselves to the same standards that I hold myself. However, God doesn’t do that with me. Imagine if God demanded that I meet his level of perfection. Luckily God doesn’t demand that of me. Yes, I know what you are thinking, “be perfect as my heavenly father is perfect.” This perfection is the result of cooperating with God, through the merits already won for us by Jesus Christ through his punishment on the cross. God doesn’t punish us for not being perfect; instead, He punishes Himself through Jesus Christ and in turn makes us perfect by our direct cooperation with Christ.  Thus if God doesn’t punish me for my imperfections, then who am I to punish others. Note that Christ’s sacrificial death on the cross does indeed remove the punishment of sin; however, in order for this to be effective , it must be applied through faith, charity, and the sacraments of the church. (For more information see Thomas Aquinas, summa theologica, tetria Pars, Q 49 article 3)
God wants us to have peace, which can only come from placing our faith, hope and trust in Jesus Christ. We should not allow disappointment to rob us of this peace. So the next time you are at Mass and hear the words, “peace be with you,” reflect on the peace that Christ wants to give you; a peace that passes all understanding.